Archive for the ‘Season 6 Music’ Category

Each season we highlight the great music that Gary Calamar, True Blood’s Music Supervisor selects for each episode and True Blood Season 6 is no exception.

As you know one song becomes the episode title, and below are the songs that were featured in the finale episode of True Blood as listed on the HBO.com/trueblood web site. We have provided links where you can purchase the songs or albums on Amazon and ITunes.

 

To see ALL of the music featured in True Blood’s Season 6, go to the MUSIC Section of our Season 6 Episode Guide.

 

Below is the music for True Blood Season 6 Finale, Episode 10 “Radioactive

Episode 6.10 – “Radioactive”
mzi.jmoqkwve.170x170-75 “Cannonball”  by The Breeders amazon Itunes
669158524495.170x170-75 “Lacksadaisical” by Paper Pilots feat. Luke Grimes amazon Itunes
 669158524495.170x170-75
“Balancing the Backlight” by Paper Pilots feat. Luke Grimes
 amazon  Itunes
669158524495.170x170-75 “Romancing Glances” by Paper Pilots feat. Luke Grimes amazon Itunes
 UMG_cvrart_00602537150120_01_RGB72_1200x1200_12UMGIM46901.170x170-75
“Radioactive” by Imagine Dragons
 amazon  Itunes

 

From radio.com‘s discussion with True Blood’s music supervisor, Gary Calamar about this week’s music:

garyc

During the first-ever daytime vampire picnic, Jessica and her new vampire lover, James, took on Jason Stackhouse and his vampire keeper, Violet, in volleyball while the Breeders‘ “Cannonball” played in the background. But Kim Deal and co.’s most well-known song almost didn’t make the cut; in fact, she just beat out Kenny Loggins.

No, really.

We initially toyed with the idea of using Kenny Loggins’ ‘Playing With The Boys’ in a little Top Gun homage,” Calamar told Radio.com, referencing a beach volleyball scene in the classic ’80s flick. “Cute idea, but ultimately we went with ‘Cannonball’ to show the joy and elation in in our characters playing volleyball in the sunlight.

Jason Stackhouse probably would have been a lot more comfortable with Maverick and Iceman than with Violet (see her sinking her claws into him in the above photo). It’s not hard to imagine Jason in this scene.

Performing at “The Bar Formerly Known As Merlotte’s,” James sings a number of songs from the L.A. band Paper Pilots (you can hear the originals on the band’s official website — the songs he covers are “Lackadaisical,” “Balancing The Blacklight” and “Romancing Glares”). For the episode, the songs were remixed with vocals from Luke Grimes, who plays James and is a musician in real life.

True Blood has traditionally veered away from the current pop charts, but for this week’s title song, “Radioactive,” they went with Imagine Dragons. While artists from Jimmy Page’s old band the Firm to Rita Ora to Kings of Leon all have songs by that name, Calamar says that a lot of thought was put into what song would end season six.

“We tried many things for the final song of season six,” he said. “We were looking for something with an apocalyptic theme that could leave us hanging and questioning the fate of our characters in season seven. We tried everything from Nine Inch Nails to Radiohead, but this Imagine Dragons track nailed it for us both lyrically and musically. It’s also great that we can use a song that is currently climbing the charts and very hot right now.

source: news.radio.com

True Blood Season 6 Music Episode 9 – “Life Matters”

Posted by Lynnpd On August - 13 - 2013

Each season we highlight the great music that Gary Calamar, True Blood’s Music Supervisor selects for each episode and True Blood Season 6 is no exception. As you know one song becomes the episode title, and below are the songs that were featured in the seventh episode of True Blood as listed on the HBO.com/trueblood web site. We have provided links where you can purchase the songs or albums on Amazon and ITunes.

To see ALL of the music featured in True Blood’s Season 6, go to the MUSIC Section of our Season 6 Episode Guide.

 

 

Below is the music for True Blood Season 6, Episode 9 “Life Matters”

Episode 6.09 – Life Matters
Cover.170x170-75 “Wandering”  by Susan James amazon Itunes
true blood music cd “I Wanna Be Your Man” by Mobleyby Matt Andersen amazon Itunes

“Far Away Home/Life Matters” by Chris Pierce and Nathan Barr (sung during the funeral)
mzi.rnmbcvji.170x170-75 “Why Did You Leave Me Now?” by  Liz Rodrigues (played over the end credits) amazon Itunes

 

From radio.com‘s discussion with True Blood’s music supervisor, Gary Calamar about this week’s music:

During his funeral this week, Sookie, Sam, Andy and Lafayette, among others, remembered Terry through a series of flashbacks. Sookie recalled Terry’s first meeting with his widow, Arlene, one night at Merlotte’s where they all first met, back in far simpler times. As the new waitress flirted with Terry (asking to “thank” him for his service to his country after work), a version of “I Wanna Be Your Man” played in the background.

Astute rock fans will recognize that song as one written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney for the Rolling Stones. Released as an early single by the Stones in England in 1963, the song served as a B-side to the Stones’ cover of Buddy Holly’s “Not Fade Away” in the U.S. the following year. The Beatles released their own version on 1963′s With The Beatles, with Ringo Starr on lead vocals.

garycEven casual Beatles fans know that it’s not easy to get permission to use a Lennon/McCartney composition on television. However, Gary Calamar tells Radio.com that he didn’t need to “glamour” anyone to get it.

“I was recently approached by a publisher who told me that they now owned the rights to some early Beatle songs that are outside of the Sony/ATV/Michael Jackson deal,” Calamar said. “I was skeptical but intrigued. I always loved the Beatles lore of how the Rolling Stones asked Lennon and McCartney for a song for their next single and John and Paul came up with ‘I Wanna Be Your Man.’ Anyway, the publisher played me a badass version of ‘I Wanna Be Your Man’ by an Austin group called Mobley that I thought would be perfect for True Blood. We worked out a nice deal and it works great in the scene. I am always happy to work with The Fab Four any way that I can.”

In related news, Calamar says that the publishing company he worked with will be “releasing an album of these ‘reimagined’ Beatle tracks later this year.” Meanwhile, Mobley’s take on the song appears on the latest True Blood soundtrack.

“Why Did You Leave Me Now?” makes its way to True Blood

Posted by Lynnpd On August - 10 - 2013

Yesterday we reported that Chris Pierce will be singing a song, (lip-synced by an actor on camera) on Sunday night’s episode 9 of True Blood, titled, “Life Matters.”

Below is an article from Thestar.com, about the creation of  “Why Did You Leave Me Now?, written by Sam Rosenbaum, and how Gary Calamar contacted him wanting to use the song on True Blood in the upcoming episode.

UPDATE: We now know that this is the song that ended the episode, and was NOT the song sung by Chris Pierce (with Big John lip-syncing) at the funeral.

The song sung at the funeral is titled, “Life Matters” and is credited to Nathan Barr and Chris Pierce as the writers.  So, unlike most episodes, the episode title was NOT the song we heard at the end of the episode, but the one sung at the funeral.

We’re not sure if this is the song Chris Pierce will be singing during the episode, but we think it might be. If not, it will, at least, be heard during the closing credits of the episode.

 

Below is the story told by Sam Rosenbaum:

Rosenbaum didn’t think he’d get his big break at 61. Much less for a song he wrote 17 years ago, but the Toronto jeweler will hear his tune on HBO’s airwaves during Sunday night’s episode of the wildly popular vampire drama True Blood, and he has his dead father to thank.

thestarsong

Sam Rosenbaum

Rosenbaum, who is not a professional musician, says the song came to him in 1996 after his dad, who had died seven years earlier, visited him in a dream.

We were both sitting on a bench in a beautiful garden,” said Rosenbaum. “We looked at each other but didn’t talk. It was non-verbal communication. He just gave me this amazing feeling.
Rosenbaum woke up and scurried down to the piano in his basement. Still brimming with euphoria, he churned out a song called “Why Did You Leave Me Now?” in less than an hour. Despite being a music manager at the time, he’d had scant experience writing songs.

Toronto jeweler Sam Rosenbaum says s dream about his father 17 years ago inspired him to write a song. That song will be featured on the wildly popular vampire series True Blood on Sunday.

The words came, the melody came, I couldn’t even explain it,” he said. “It was a song that expressed a loss.

Rosenbaum had the song professionally recorded with Liz Rodrigues, one of the artists he managed, on vocals. Despite his initial excitement, the song barely made a blip on the popular music radar.
Everybody in the music business thinks their song’s going to become famous,” he said. “But nothing happened. I just forgot about it.

Rosenbaum eventually ditched the music industry. He decided to enter the jewelry sales business and remained there for 17 years. He moved on.

But a month ago, out of nowhere, he got a call from True Blood’s musical director, Gary Calamar. He said he wanted to use “Why Did You Leave Me Now?” in his series.

“At first, I didn’t believe it,” said Rosenbaum. “But I Googled him and found out he was the Real McCoy. He was a Grammy nominee.

Rosenbaum asked Calamar how he found the song. Calamar said his producers happened to stumble upon it on iTunes under Rodrigues’ album, Just a Dream.

“I look at it as a gift from my father,” said Rosenbaum. “I call it divine intervention. How else can something like this happen?

Gary Calamar tells a slightly less juicy story to sink your fangs into.

“It was the title, “Why Did You Leave Me Now?” that got the attention of the producers, as each episode title of True Blood is named after a song that appears in the episode,” he said. “We came across it on an iTunes search, and we thought it worked perfectly in the scene.”

Rosenbaum’s song will run during the closing credits of Sunday night’s True Blood episode.

Chris Pierce to sing in scene of True Blood Episode 9

Posted by Lynnpd On August - 9 - 2013

Last night, friends and I went to a club in Santa Monica to see Tara Buck’s (Ginger) husband, Chris Pierce and his new group, Reverend Tall Tree & The Blackstrap Brothers.

Check out Chris’ next gig at Sassafras on August 15, 2013 in Hollywood.

revtalltred

Before the event, when I arrived, I talked with Chris and he asked me if I knew he was going to be on True Blood? I said, no, what do you mean?  He said that his voice would be featured in a scene of this week’s episode. He’s also just announced it on his Facebook page, so it’s now OK to post here.  See below what Chris has to say:

I’m really excited that my voice will be heard on this weeks episode of TB. It was a wonderful surprise and honor to get a call from Gary Calamar asking me to contribute my voice to a scene in this weeks episode. Without giving away any spoilers you won’t be seeing my face but you’ll definitely hear me singing in a very powerful moment of the show. Here’s a link if folks want to hear more of my voice https://itunes/i6xm4b9

I’m extra thrilled that it happens to be an episode that my wife, Tara [Buck] Pierce is also in!

So, be sure to listen for Chris singing in a special scene of Sunday nights episode of True Blood, episode 9, titled, “Life Matters.”  You won’t forget it, as I can confirm that Chris is a remarkable talent. And, be sure to check him out on itunes at the link above.

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Tara Buck and Chris Pierce 

True Blood Season 6 Music Episode 8 – “Dead Meat”

Posted by Lynnpd On August - 6 - 2013

episodemusicsquareEach season we highlight the great music that Gary Calamar, True Blood’s Music Supervisor selects for each episode and True Blood Season 6 is no exception. As you know one song becomes the episode title, and below are the songs that were featured in the seventh episode of True Blood as listed on the HBO.com/trueblood web site. We have provided links where you can purchase the songs or albums on Amazon and ITunes.

 

Below is the music for True Blood Season 6, Episode 8 “Dead Meat”

Episode 6.08 – Dead Meat
634457432369.170x170-75 “Red & White & Blue & Gold” by Aoife O’Donovan amazon Itunes
061297296569_cover.170x170-75 “Fired Up”

by Matt Andersen

amazon Itunes

“Slidell”

by James Combs and Joey Peters

mzi.zcvqlsnw.170x170-75 “Dead Meat”

by  Sean Lennon

amazon Itunes

 

Every week during season six, Radio.com speaks with Gary Calamar, about the music in the episode. See his comment below:

Radio.com reports that going into this week’s episode of True Blood, there were a lot of questions: How crazy would Eric go in the wake of Nora’s death by “hep-V?” Would Pam actually get naked with her “vamp camp”-assigned shrink? (Yes:  ”It was oozy – but productive,” she reported). And who is the hot vampire in the female prison in “vamp camp?”

But also, the title: “Dead Meat.” A bevy of artists have recorded songs with that title, including Bush, Pussy Galore, Judas Priest, the Supersuckers, and D.R.I.  So, which one would be in the show?

None of the above: the song they used was by Sean Lennon, from his 2006 album Friendly Fire, allegedly inspired by the breakup of his relationship with ex-girlfriend Bijou Phillips.  ”Dead meat,” he sings. “Don’t you know you’re dead meat/You just messed with the wrong team/Better not try and fall sleep now.” Ouch!

But who does it apply to?  Could it be Bill, who may have made Eric his enemy again by not acting quickly enough to get Warlow’s blood in time to save Nora? Could it be Tara, Pam, Jessica and all the other vampires still in “vamp camp,” who may end up meeting the sun and the “true death,” per Bill’s visions?  Or maybe just Jason Stackhouse, who has been “claimed” by the mysterious Violet as “hers” for eternity (he’s now her source of both food and sex – the latter will take place when she feels like it and only then). If they escape from this vampire prison, trust that Jason will be sweating Violet for a long time.

It could, of course, be applied literally to Ms. Suzuki, who works for the Japanese company who creates Tru Blood. After she discovered that Governor Burrell’s deal with the company has allowed him to infect all outgoing bottles with hep-V, Sarah Newlin ends up feeding her to the male vampires.

garycMusic Supervisor Gary Calamar tells Radio.com simply, “I’m not sure who came up with Sean Lennon’s ‘Dead Meat’ for this week’s end credit song, but when we listened to it at the spotting session we all agreed it was perfect in tone and lyrics.

 
source: news.radio.com

episodemusicsquareEach season we highlight the great music that Gary Calamar, True Blood’s Music Supervisor selects for each episode and True Blood Season 6 is no exception. As you know one song becomes the episode title, and below are the songs that were featured in the seventh episode of True Blood as listed on the HBO.com/trueblood web site. We have provided links where you can purchase the songs or albums on Amazon and ITunes.

 

Below is the music for True Blood Season 6, Episode 7 “In The Evening”

Episode 6.07 – In The Evening
mzi.aqhuzqmw.170x170-75 “Call Your Bluff” by Grant Langston amazon Itunes
Led Zeppelin "In The Evening" In The Evening” by Led Zeppelin amazon Itunes

 
garycGary Calamar talks about Episode 7, “In The Evening” and how they acquired and picked the songs.

What we heard were ominous rumbles before Robert Plant wailed, “In the eeeeeve-ning… when the day is done.”

What we saw was an anguished Eric Northman clutching Nora in the last moments of her life, before a strain of “Hep-V” led her to the “true death.”

“Oh, oh, I need your love/I need your love/Oh, I need your love, I just got to have…” When Plant sang those lyrics on “In The Evening” (from Led Zeppelin‘s 1979 swan song In Through The Out Door), it was, like many of Zeppelin’s blues-based songs, lust-driven. Hearing it as Eric grieves over Nora, his dead sister and lover (it’s complicated), “In The Evening” becomes an anthem of despair.

Led Zeppelin is notoriously picky about licensing their music for TV, film and advertising synchs. Jack Black famously begged them for permission to use “The Immigrant Song” in School Of Rock. True Blood music supervisor Gary Calamar told Radio.com how Zeppelin came to Bon Temps.

“One of our assistant editors did what every music supervisor dreads,” he said. “He ‘temped’ the last scene with the song,” meaning he put it in as a placeholder until they could figure out another song to use.

“This should never happen, as it leads to a phenomenon known as ‘temp love,’” Calamar continued. “That is when the producers see the scene with a song temped in and it works really well, and now they can no longer see any other song working in that scene. When you have a rich and costly song like ‘In The Evening,’ that can be a big problem.  We tried many other songs that worked to varying degrees, but nothing worked as well as ‘In The Evening.’ So after discussions, negotiations and hoop jumping, we hammered out a deal. And we are thrilled to have the song in the show.”

Still, there are few other songs titled “In The Evening.” Sheryl Lee Ralph’s ’80s era dance song “In The Evening” wouldn’t have had the same gravitas, though “In The Evening (When The Sun Goes Down),” which has been recorded by John Lee Hooker, Gary Clark Jr. and Ray Charles, may have worked. But what if Zeppelin had said no, and there were no other alternatives?”The script always starts out with a title and a song to go along with that title,” Calamar explained. “When we get to our spotting session it is decided if that writer’s song choice will actually work, or if I need to find a replacement. I would say it’s about 50/50 that the original song sticks.”

Happily for everyone, this time it worked out. Well, happily for everyone except Eric and Nora.

Vampires certainly are having a rough time this season, but there were some rays of light this week. Well, not really, but at least some of them were getting naked. As arranged by former lover Jason Stackhouse (also complicated), Jessica had a secret meeting with James, the vampire who refused to rape her when ordered to do so by the scientists at “vamp camp” last week. (This week, she asked him to have sex with her; it was her first time with another vampire.) Elsewhere in vamp camp, the ever-crafty Pam continued to seduce the psychologist who has been picking her brain. You can play “In The Evening” in either of those scenes, and it would be equally effective, albeit with a different tone.

Next week’s episode is called “Dead Meat,” which provides a lot more song choices. Sean Lennon, Bush, Judas Priest, Pussy Galore, the Supersuckers and D.R.I. are among the acts who have recorded a song under that name.

 

source: news.radio.com

episodemusicsquareEach season we highlight the great music that Gary Calamar, True Blood’s Music Supervisor selects for each episode and True Blood Season 6 is no exception. As you know one song becomes the episode title, and below are the songs that were featured in the sixth episode of True Blood as listed on the HBO.com/trueblood web site. We have provided links where you can purchase the songs or albums on Amazon and ITunes.

Below is the music for True Blood Season 6, Episode 6 “Don’t You Feel Me”

Episode 6.06 – Do You Feel Me
Born To Be Loved” by Lucinda Williams amazon Itunes
“Strut” by Travis Colby amazon Itunes
“Hush Little Baby” sung by Arlene Bellefleur
“Don’t You Feel Me” by Damon

 

Danniel Kenneth Writer

Every week during season six, Radio.com checks in with “True Blood” Music Supervisor Gary Calamar, who has been nominated for GRAMMYs twice for his work on the show. This week, at Gary’s suggestion, they spoke to Daniel Kenneth, who wrote this week’s episode.

The song — “Don’t You Feel Me” by an fairly obscure 1960s artist named Damon — could have been written for Warlow and Sookie. Warlow, for those just tuning in, is a faerie-vampire hybrid who has the ability that all vampires want: the ability to walk in the daylight. While Sookie had resisted Warlow’s charms up until now, even threatening to kill him the last time they got naked together, (spoiler alert) this week’s episode saw her saving Warlow by hiding him in the faerie plane (where his maker Billith can’t detect him). As an added bonus, she also consummated their relationship, albeit after tying him to a gravestone at his request. Sex is never simple around Bon Temps, is it?

For his writing debut, True Blood writer Daniel Kenneth choose “Don’t You Feel Me” as the title of the episode. Clearly, he was feeling Damon’s song.

“It’s this amazing little gem first heard on a ’60s psychedelic rock compilation Forge Your Own Chains on Now-Again Records a few years back,” he tells Radio.com. ”Egon [aka, Now-Again Records founder Eothen Alapatt], a big fan of the show himself, used to send the True Blood writers’ office Now-Again Records releases over the years. They all made their way into my own iTunes library, but this song stuck in my head.”

Kenneth thought it apropos for the episode on many levels, particularly for Sookie and Warlow.

“Time works differently in the faerie plane, and we designed it as sort of a one-act play within the episode,” he said. “There’s similar maker/progeny connections going on with other characters — Bill and Jessica, Eric and Willa — but I loved it as a title in regards to Sookie and Warlow because it’s a statement. They’re telling Bill, ‘Don’t you feel me.’”

However, the lyrics also pertain to the pair’s budding relationship. As Kenneth points out, “It speaks to Sookie and Warlow as two fated lovers, possibly destined to be with one another forever — day and night.”

There was just one other music moment on this week’s True Blood. When Terry Bellefleur went to Lafayette’s house to entrust him with the key to his safe deposit box, Lucinda Williams’ “Born To Be Loved” was audible. From the Americana star’s 2011 album Blessed, the song was another choice from Kenneth.

“I love this song so much, and thought it’s sweet melodic lyrics about how precious every life is (and though still quite somber in tone), it could play tragically under a scene with Terry as he continues with his plan to kill himself,” Kenneth explained. “There’s reasons to live life everywhere — including the on the radio — that he just doesn’t want to, but more importantly can’t, hear.”

It’s not the first time Williams has been heard on True Blood.

“In the very first episode we used ‘Lake Charles,’ which worked beautifully as Bill and Sookie were just getting acquainted,” True Blood music supervisor Gary Calamar points. “And we were honored that she wrote ‘Kiss Like Your Kiss’ for us in season three. Lucinda, who is a Louisiana gal, is of course brilliant songwriter with a beautiful twang in her voice. She’s modern and classic. A perfect sound for the soundtrack of our friends in Bon Temps!”

 

source: news.radio.com

episodemusicsquareEach season we highlight the great music that Gary Calamar, True Blood’s Music Supervisor selects for each episode and True Blood Season 6 is no exception. As you know one song becomes the episode title, and below are the songs that were featured in the fifth episode of True Blood as listed on the HBO.com/trueblood web site. We have provided links where you can purchase the songs or albums on Amazon and ITunes.

 

Below is the music for True Blood Season 6, Episode 5 “F**k The Pain Away

 

Episode 6.05 – F**k The Pain Away
“Hail Maary” by Ex Lions
“Hurricane” by The Go Getters not on amazon
“Git Yours Yet” by John Acosta not on amazon
Peaches “F**k the Pain Away” by Peaches

 
angelarobinsonGARY CALAMAR SHARES INFO ABOUT THE SONGS FROM EPISODES 5

This week, per Gary Calamar’s suggestion News.Radio.com spoke to Angela Robinson about the music choices since she wrote the episode:

“F*** The Pain Away.” Music fans of a certain age and hipness likely recognized the title of this week’s True Blood as the 2000 breakthrough hit from Canadian dance-punk Peaches. The question isn’t why True Blood used it, but what took so long for them to use it. Over the past few seasons, a number of characters have gotten naked to forget their various problems; certainly the song could have applied to Tara, Sam, Jessica and Sookie over the years.

True Blood writer Angela Robinson tells Radio.com that when she wrote the episode, she was experiencing her own pain, albeit a more physical variety.

I had a week to write this episode and I had broken my ankle in three places the weekend before I began writing, so I was kind of high on Percocet during much of the writing,” she explains, “so I was literally fighting my own physical pain while writing it, which I think was a subliminal factor in my choice.”

The song, however, worked on a number of levels, for a number of characters.

I felt like the song summed up the emotion of the episode,” Robinson says. “I felt like all the characters were dealing with intense personal pain, each in their own way, and everybody was acting out, either avoiding their pain or in Sookie’s case, trying to get to the root of it. Also, Sarah Newlin and Jason are both trying to f*** the pain away with each other, Bill and Warlow are figuratively f***ing the pain away with each other, Andy has to bottle his rage and quest for revenge, Pam has to go to therapy in vamp camp and gives a speech on the notion of pain and the differences between the human experience of pain vs. the vampire experience of pain — it all seemed to work together.”

But there was one main character who inspired the choice of the song: Jessica Hamby, who last week, murdered Andy Bellefleur’s faerie daughters (though one actually survived). Robinson “hung the whole episode on Jessica’s faerie-blood drug trip: the side effects of drinking faerie blood is vampires get high and horny so Jessica goes on a despair-guilt-sex-drug trip throughout the episode,” which included a bold pass at her maker/father figure Bill Compton and later her ex, Jason Stackhouse (who has just finished fornicating the pain away with right-wing anti-vampire Sarah Newlin).

“This leads her to a pretty defeated, nihilistic place,” Robinson says, “and I thought the Peaches song fit perfectly.”

Robinson recalls first hearing the song years ago: “My friend took me to see Peaches perform at a club in LA and I remembered thinking how intense and insane and subversive she was with that song/record. I love the all the songs on that album, but the opening beat/riff of “F*** the Pain Away” followed by that lyric has always stuck with me, so I was excited to have a chance to use it.”

It’s about time, though it’s not as though the song hasn’t been featured in a number of movies and TV shows, including Lost in Translation and 30 Rock. At least on True Blood, “F*** The Pain Away” was used in a way that fully honored its hedonistic nature.

 

Go to the True Blood Season 6 Epside Guide to see all the music by episode by clicking here.

True Blood Season 6 Music Episode 4 – At Last

Posted by Lynnpd On July - 8 - 2013

episodemusicsquareEach season we highlight the great music that Gary Calamar, True Blood’s Music Supervisor selects for each episode and True Blood Season 6 is no exception. As you know one song becomes the episode title, and below are the songs that were featured in the fourth episode of True Blood as listed on the HBO.com/trueblood web site. We have provided links where you can purchase the songs or albums on Amazon and ITunes.

 

Below is the music for True Blood Season 6, Episode 4 “At Last”

 

Episode 6.04 – At Last
“(She’s A) Wanderer” by Deap Vally
VAULTNO-AMAZON
VAULTNO-AMAZON
The creeper by Pelican The Creeper” by Pelican
VAULTNO-AMAZON
VAULTNO-AMAZON
“Adorn” by Miguel
VAULTNO-AMAZON
VAULTNO-AMAZON
“So What” by Doozy
VAULTNO-AMAZON
VAULTNO-AMAZON
“Doing Well” by The Mid Cities
VAULTNO-AMAZON
“At Last” by Etta James
VAULTNO-AMAZON
VAULTNO-AMAZON

 

Radio.com spoke with Gary Calamar about the show’s song selections.

 

garyc “At Last” seemed especially ripe for a remake, and he says that they had a specific artist in mind to it for the episode. “At one point there was some talk about using a great new artist named Lianne La Havas,” he says: but it wouldn’t have been realistic. Sookie’s record collection has been inherited from her Grandmother. ”As hip as Gran was, this is not something she would have had in her vintage record collection.” And given that La Havas debuted in 2011, it would have been chronologically impossible (as Gran died in season 1, which took place in 2008 — or at least that’s when it aired).“

At first I was not in favor of using Etta James’ ‘At Last,’ as it is such a well known classic and I like to throw curveballs whenever I can,” Calamar admits. “But after watching the scene with writer Alex Woo, I realized that this was a bullseye, and classics are classics for a reason!”

As for “Adorn,” it was written into the scene before Calamar even saw the script. “When the writers and producers showed me the scene, this song was in there. Everybody loved it and my mission was to clear it.”

“Apparently ‘Adorn’ was inspired by a series of dreams that Miguel had experienced. That feeling, and the romance of it, worked very beautifully.” Of course, Jason Stackhouse may not agree!

It wasn’t all about love songs though: Andy Bellefleur’s quickly aging (and ill-fated) daughters hit puberty just days after being born. No sooner than they grew their boobs did they steal dad’s ride (a police car, no less!) and took off for the convenience store to score some booze. And although most cruisers don’t have a stereo system, dad’s fortunately did! So, what were they listening to?

Calamar says, “I chose a new band from LA that I am very excited about, Deap Vally. They are starting to get a lot of attention. They rock. Hard. Their band is just two girls with bare bones instrumentation: guitar and drums a la The Black Keys. I felt that their song ‘(She’s A) Wanderer’ really captured these wild fairy ‘teenagers’ joy riding in their daddy’s police car. I’m very pleased that we got this song on our new soundtrack just as we had to go to press to finalize the track list.” Deap Vally just played at the Glastonbury Festival in the UK, as well as a few US festivals.

 

True Blood Season 6 Music Episode 3 – You’re No Good

Posted by Lynnpd On July - 1 - 2013

episodemusicsquareEach season we highlight the great music that Gary Calamar, True Blood’s Music Supervisor selects for each episode and True Blood Season 6 is no exception. As you know one song becomes the episode title, and below are the songs that were featured in the third episode of True Blood as listed on the HBO.com/trueblood web site. We have provided links where you can purchase the songs or albums on Amazon and ITunes.


True Blood Episode 6.03 – You’re No Good

Episode 6.03 – You’re No Good
mzi.rxugyptg.170x170-75 “You’re No Good” by The Plasticines VAULTNO-AMAZON VAULTITUNES
“7 discos of the world” by L’Avventura No download No download

 

True Blood is known for including excellent music to go along with the story. The music is all handpicked by music supervisor Gary Calamar who also consults with the writers and Creative and Executive Producer, Brian Buckner. Gary has turned lots of fans on to great music that may never have been heard before.

GARY CALAMAR SHARES INFO ABOUT THE SONGS FROM EPISODES 3

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After the first two episodes of season six of True Blood didn’t feature music until the end credits, episode three — “You’re No Good” — added a bit to the show itself.

A new storyline this season is that of the Vampire Unity Society, an organization of humans trying to open a dialog in order to prevent a human/non-human war. Previously, co-founder Nicole Wright tried to get Sam to “come out” of the closet as a shape-shifter. No big spoilers here, but the organization — who seem a bit conflicted about their goals — drove up to Alcide and the wolf pack’s compound (where the frequently shirtless pack leader has had tensions with his self-described “No. 1 Bitch,” Rikki, pictured). The VUS were listening to industrial-sounding music on their car stereo. “The song they were playing in the car was ’7 Discos Of The World’ from a great Bay Area band called L’Avventura,” Calamar told Radio.com.

The San Francisco group has been around since the mid-2000s, and previously contributed a cover of the Zombies’ “She’s Not There” to an episode in season four.

“They write amazing songs and have a super cool sound,” Calamar said. But, more importantly, “We wanted something that these hipsters would be listening to on their quest for werewolves.”

The episode’s title track ended up being the classic song written by Clint Ballard Jr., as well as a hit for Betty Everett in 1963, a No. 1 for Linda Ronstadt in 1975, and eventually covered by Van Halen. Another option Calamar looked at was a more recent song of the same name, by Major Lazer.

“I had heard the Major Lazer track and I got very excited to use a brand new song,” he said, “but alas it wasn’t working for the episode.”

Calamar continued: “I believe it was producer Brian Buckner that suggested this classic song after we all watched the episode in a spotting session. Everybody loved the idea and I went on a hunt for the right version for the show. We checked out the Van Halen and Linda Ronstadt versions. I loved the original Betty Everett version very much, but we ended up choosing a super cool garage version from the French band the Plastiscines. It’s great! We had used another one of their songs, “Bitch,” in season five. I seem to have a soft spot for the young female garage rockers. In the past we’ve used the Runaways and Care Bears on Fire.”

Gary also offered a rare preview into next week’s True Blood: “In episode four, we also have a great girl garage duo from Los Angeles, called Deap Vally. Their song “(She’s A) Wanderer” is on our new True Blood Soundtrack (Vol. 4). They are wild!”

Next week’s episode is called “At Last.” Could it be the classic made iconic by Etta James? With True Blood, you never can be sure if they’ll go for the obvious. That’s the song that The Vault has chosen as the title song for episode 4.

Be sure to check out our page devoted to all the Music from True Blood Season 6 in the True Blood Season 6 Episode Guide.

 

source: radio.com

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